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Balashark

February 1, 2009

Bala Shark Factoids

Origin

Thailand, Malaysia (Borneo and Sumatra)

Maximum Size

14 inches (10 to 12 more likely)

Housing

Longer the better

Security

Loves planted aquaria. Prefers to school.

Temperature

Prefers 75 to 80

Attitude

Good eater. Fantastic jumper when scared.

Foods

Loves all foods. Needs vegetable matter.

Water

Prefers pH around neutral. Add salt.


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Adult bala shark.  Over red gravel he reflects pink.  Natural gravels work better.

Origins: Most bala sharks come from Far Eastern fish farms these days. The larger ones cost more than the smaller ones (as we all know). The smaller ones are much more fragile.

Name Origin: “Bala” comes from the first part of their scientific name. “Shark” comes from their high dorsal fin that makes them look like a saltwater shark. Of course, they’re not. Many cyprinids (minnows) with high dorsal fins earn the more sellable name “shark.” The melanopterus in their scientific name means black fins. Some folks call them “silver sharks” due to their basic body color.

Water Conditions: Bala sharks adjust to nearly any water conditions. They will fit into most community tanks with no little bite-size fishes.

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Much better looking when not over red gravel.  Even young bala sharks look sharky.

Appeal: People like bala sharks because they look like sharks. They also get along fine with other fishes. They’re easy to keep and rarely stop patrolling the waters of their aquaria.

Size: Theoretically, these bala sharks grow to 14 inches. However, most people provide too small an aquarium to grow them to their maximum size.

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Nine-inch bala sharks that jumped around in a bucket while being moved.  Really scraped.

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A week later they’re fairly well healed up.

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Another two weeks and they’re good as new — even with this severum.

Jumpers: You’d expect speedy swimmers to jump. Bala sharks will not disappoint you. They will bail from uncovered tanks – especially if spooked. One key jumping time – when you turn on their lights.

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Bala sharks love to hang together.

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Just introduced guy on the right.  He’ll color up in about 10 minutes.

Schoolers: If given a choice these guys like to hang with their buds. The more the merrier. However, they will not pine away when kept as singles. Bala sharks will get better colors and swim more when kept in groups.

Breeding: Rates right in there with stacking B-Bs. You will not likely spawn bala sharks without the spawning hormone extracted from carp and access to very large aquaria or sizable ponds.

Breeding Suggestions: If you wish to try, bala sharks attain maturity at nine inches. The females are chubbier than the sleeker males. Separate the sexes to condition them. Then set up a spawning tank like a large barb spawning setup.

Foods: Bala sharks eagerly eat whatever you feed them. They need foods with algae in them. Balas also love live foods and frozen foods. Color foods will also make them turn darker.

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Bala sharks look good in bare tanks.

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They look better in planted tanks — even with plastic plants.

Gravel Choice: Darker gravels will darken your bala sharks. Light gravels tend to bleach them out.

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Bala sharks love swimming with their own kind and bother no one.

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The more bala sharks the merrier.

Great Tank Mates: Despite their totally different personalities, bala sharks fit well into tanks of angel fish. This silver/black color combo needs other fish to give it color. Add some of the more colorful gouramis. Think of your bala shark as a large, non-nippy barb. Feel free to mix them with any of the other barbs. Do not mix them with large, rough cichlids.  Your shark can out run African cichlids but not forever.

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Size: Theoretically, these bala sharks grow to 14 inches. However, most people provide too small an aquarium to grow them to their maximum size.

LA
Nine-inch bala sharks that jumped around in a bucket while being moved.  Really scraped.

LA
A week later they’re fairly well healed up.

LA
Another two weeks and they’re good as new — even with this severum.

Jumpers: You’d expect speedy swimmers to jump. Bala sharks will not disappoint you. They will bail from uncovered tanks – especially if spooked. One key jumping time – when you turn on their lights.

LA
Bala sharks love to hang together.

LA
Just introduced guy on the right.  He’ll color up in about 10 minutes.

Schoolers: If given a choice these guys like to hang with their buds. The more the merrier. However, they will not pine away when kept as singles. Bala sharks will get better colors and swim more when kept in groups.

Breeding: Rates right in there with stacking B-Bs. You will not likely spawn bala sharks without the spawning hormone extracted from carp and access to very large aquaria or sizable ponds.

Breeding Suggestions: If you wish to try, bala sharks attain maturity at nine inches. The females are chubbier than the sleeker males. Separate the sexes to condition them. Then set up a spawning tank like a large barb spawning setup.

Foods: Bala sharks eagerly eat whatever you feed them. They need foods with algae in them. Balas also love live foods and frozen foods. Color foods will also make them turn darker.

LA
Bala sharks look good in bare tanks.

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They look better in planted tanks — even with plastic plants.

Gravel Choice: Darker gravels will darken your bala sharks. Light gravels tend to bleach them out.

LA
Bala sharks love swimming with their own kind and bother no one.

LA
The more bala sharks the merrier.

Great Tank Mates: Despite their totally different personalities, bala sharks fit well into tanks of angel fish. This silver/black color combo needs other fish to give it color. Add some of the more colorful gouramis. Think of your bala shark as a large, non-nippy barb. Feel free to mix them with any of the other barbs. Do not mix them with large, rough cichlids.  Your shark can out run African cichlids but not forever. window.google_render_ad();LA
Note the protruding mouth as this bala shark eats.

Protective Plants: Some aquarists consider bala sharks a shy fish. Add some grassy plants such as Vallisneria or Sagittarius to make them feel more at home. Even plastic plants help.

Disease: Bala sharks catch “ich” fairly easily — especially the baby balas. Always add an ich cure at half strength any time you add new bala sharks to your tank.

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Bala sharks look good in most tanks.

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Net your bala sharks carefully.  Their dorsal fin often catches in your net.

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Pair of six inchers.

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10-incher.  They do get bigger.

Filtration: Bala sharks like clean water. Do not overfeed. Add snails to
clean up the excess. LA.

diambil dari

http://aqualandpetsplus.com/Shark,%20Bala.htm

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